LWV Detroit Celebrates Pride Month

LWV logo with pride rainbow behind it

This month (and every month), we’re uplifting our LGBTQIA heroes who continue to fight for a more inclusive and equitable democracy.

Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion Policy

LWV is committed to diversity, equity, and inclusion in principle and practice. These principles are central to the organization’s current and future success in engaging all individuals, households, communities, and policymakers in creating a more perfect democracy.

There shall be no barriers to full participation in this organization based on gender, gender identity, ethnicity, race, native or Indigenous origin, age, generation, sexual orientation, culture, religion, belief system, marital status, parental status, socioeconomic status, language, accent, ability status, mental health, educational level or background, geography, nationality, work style, work experience, job role function, thinking style, personality type, physical appearance, political perspective or affiliation and/or any other characteristic that can be identified as recognizing or illustrating diversity.

From the Library of Congress: Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, and Queer (LGBTQ) Pride Month is currently celebrated each year in the month of June to honor the 1969 Stonewall Uprising in Manhattan. The Stonewall Uprising was a tipping point for the Gay Liberation Movement in the United States. In the United States, the last Sunday in June was initially celebrated as “Gay Pride Day,” but the actual day was flexible. In major cities nationwide, the “day” soon grew to encompass a month-long series of events. Today, celebrations include pride parades, picnics, parties, workshops, symposia, and concerts, and LGBTQ Pride Month events attract millions of participants worldwide. Memorials are held during this month for those members of the community who have been lost to hate crimes or HIV/AIDS. The purpose of the commemorative month is to recognize the impact that lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender individuals have had on history locally, nationally, and internationally.

In 1994, a coalition of education-based organizations in the United States designated October as LGBT History Month. In 1995, a resolution passed by the General Assembly of the National Education Association included LGBT History Month within a list of commemorative months. National Coming Out Day (October 11) and the first “March on Washington” in 1979 are commemorated in the LGBTQ community during LGBT History Month.

To read more, click HERE.