Virtual Presentations

Under normal circumstances, the Detroit League would be hosting continuous town halls and educational events as a means to educate voters on issues relative to our community. and candidate forums. But these are not normal times. So to fulfill our obligations, we are posting digital information. See below for links to virtual presentations and informational videos as well as information on the Census, the Citizens Redistricting Commission, and Michigan’s new voting laws.

Voting Safely November 3⏤Online Presentation

Voting is always important, but there are more public health and safety considerations this year.

Learn about registering, confirming your registration, and voting in an online informational session from the Detroit League of Women Voters and Detroit Public Library. We will address both absentee and in-person voting, along with the COVID-19 precautions that the Department of Elections will be taking for safety. There will be time for questions, and a brief description of the League of Women Voters.

Zoom link will be sent to registrants Friday, September 11, 2020. To register for the event: https://dpl-voting-september.eventbrite.com

For more information, contact the LWV of Detroit by email at lwvdetroit@gmail.com or by phone at 313-288-9590.

Virtual Town Hall: New Voting Rights

Look here for information on new voting laws in the state of Michigan.

Informational Video: Absentee Voting

As part of their Voting 101 series, Get Out The Vote (GOTV) and the City of Southfield, MI, produced a voter informational video about Absentee Voting.  Click here to view the video.

Virtual Town Hall: Census 2020

The 2020 Census counts every person living in the United States and five U.S. territories. In mid-March, homes across the country began receiving invitations to complete the 2020 Census. Once the invitation arrives, you should respond for your home in one of three ways: online, by phone, or by mail. When you respond to the census, you’ll tell the Census Bureau where you live as of April 1, 2020.

Click here for the link to frequently asked questions about the Census, such as what the census form looks like and what questions it asks.

Virtual Town Hall: Citizens Redistricting Commission⏤The Answer to Gerrymandering

Every 10 years following the U.S. Census, district lines for political offices must be redrawn in states across the country to accurately reflect their population. In Michigan, a randomly selected commission of citizens is responsible for drawing U.S. Congressional and Michigan State House and Senate district lines. Voters amended the state constitution in the November 2018 general election to make citizens — not legislators or special interests — responsible for drawing district lines (called “redistricting”). The commission will be composed of 13 randomly-selected Michigan registered voters: four who affiliate with the Democratic Party, four who affiliate with the Republican Party, and five who do not affiliate with either major political party.